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Tuesday, May 22

  1. page Persuasive Writing edited ... (State the issue- the thesis statement and explain its importance and topical relevance.) 2. …
    ...
    (State the issue- the thesis statement and explain its importance and topical relevance.)
    2. Your View (this could be several short paragraphs)
    ...
    and personal experience.)
    3. Alternative View
    (Show awareness that there is an alternative viewpoint and give its main arguments.)
    4. Criticism of Alternative View
    (Demolish the alternative viewpoint by exposing its weaknesses.)
    5. Conclusion
    (Conclude with a summary of your position on the issue and/or what you think future developments might be.)
    Argument/ Persuasive Writing Structure
    1. Introduction
    (State the issue- the thesis statement and explain its importance and topical relevance.)
    2. Your View (this could be several short paragraphs)
    (Give all the reasons you can think of why your position is the sensible one, supporting each point with evidence in the form of statistic, example, analogy, detail, quotation and personal experience.)
    experience DEFOREST.)
    3. Alternative View
    (Show awareness that there is an alternative viewpoint and give its main arguments.)
    (view changes)
    2:31 am
  2. page descriptive writing edited Good descriptive writing depends heavily on observing and recollecting vivid moments. Unlike narrat…
    Good descriptive writing depends heavily on observing and recollecting vivid moments. Unlike narrative writing, you need to be an observer rather than a participant. Character and event should not take priority.
    The{034063.jpg}
    The
    general characteristics
    ...
    writing include: {034063.jpg}
    rich,
    rich, vivid, and
    use of sensory imagery
    figurative language such as simile, hyperbole, metaphor, symbolism and personification
    ...
    2)Expanding on your observations:
    · Here’s an extract describing cricket (from "In A Sunburned Country", by Bill Bryson, first edition, hardcover, pages 105 - 108): in a humorous manner:
    ...
    the beginning.
    Imagine

    Imagine
    a form
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    have cricket.
    The mystery of cricket is not that Australians play it well, but that they play it at all. It has always seemed to me a game much too restrained for the rough-and-tumble Australian temperament. Australians much prefer games in which brawny men in scanty clothing bloody each other's noses. I am quite certain that if the rest of the world vanished over night and the development of cricket was left in Australian hands, within a generation the players would be wearing shorts and using the bats to hit each other. And the thing is, it would be a much better game for it."
    III) WRITING THE FIRST DRAFT:
    (view changes)
    2:29 am
  3. page descriptive writing edited ... After years of patient study (and with cricket there can be no other kind) I have decided that…
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    After years of patient study (and with cricket there can be no other kind) I have decided that there is nothing wrong with the game that the introduction of golf carts wouldn't fix in a hurry. It is not true that the English invented cricket as a way of making all other human endeavors look interesting and lively; that was merely an unintended side effect. I don't wish to denigrate a sport that is enjoyed by millions, some of them awake and facing the right way, but it is an odd game. It is the only sport that incorporates meal breaks. It is the only sport that shares its name with an insect. It is the only sport in which spectators burn as many calories as players -- more if they are moderately restless. It is the only competitive activity of any type, other than perhaps baking, in which you can dress in white from head to toe and be as clean at the end of the day as you were at the beginning.
    Imagine a form of baseball in which the pitcher, after each delivery, collects the ball from the catcher and walks slowly with it to center field; and that there, after a minute's pause to collect himself, he turns and runs full tilt toward the pitcher's mound before hurling the ball at the ankles of a man who stands before him wearing a riding hat, heavy gloves of the sort used to to handle radio-active isotopes, and a mattress strapped to each leg. Imagine moreover that if this batsman fails to hit the ball in a way that heartens him sufficiently to try to waddle forty feet with mattress's strapped to his legs, he is under no formal compunction to run; he may stand there all day, and, as a rule, does. If by some miracle he is coaxed into making a misstroke that leads to his being put out, all the fielders throw up their arms in triumph and have a hug. Then tea is called and every one retires happily to a distant pavilion to fortify for the next siege. Now imagine all this going on for so long that by the time the match concludes autumn has crept in and all your library books are overdue. There you have cricket.
    ...
    for it."
    III) WRITING THE FIRST DRAFT:
    · Focus on a moment: rather than a series of events (this would make the story a narrative)
    (view changes)
    2:27 am

Monday, May 14

  1. page space.menu edited ... Informative Writing Persuasive Writing Discursive Writing Descriptive writing Narrative …
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    Informative Writing
    Persuasive Writing
    Discursive Writing
    Descriptive writing
    Narrative writing
    ...
    Dover Beach
    SONGS OF OURSELVES (for examination in 2013)
    The CityCity Planners and The Planners
    STORIES OF OURSELVES
    Taste of A Watermelon
    (view changes)
    7:53 pm
  2. page Glossary of Poetic Terms edited ... Sonnet The word sonnet comes from the Italian word sonnetto meaning little song. Sonnets are…
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    Sonnet
    The word sonnet comes from the Italian word sonnetto meaning little song. Sonnets are lyric poems of 14 lines and fall into two main types: English (Shakespearean) or Italian (Petrarchan). Petrarchan or Italian sonnet divided into one octave with a rhyme scheme of abbaabba, and one sestet with a rhyme scheme of cdecde, cdccdc, or cdedce. The Shakespearean (or English) sonnet has three quatrains followed by a rhymed couplet. This follows the rhyme scheme of abab, cdcd, efef, gg.
    ...
    John Milton.
    The Shakespearean: Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
    Narrative
    (view changes)
    3:32 am
  3. page Glossary of Poetic Terms edited ... Any story set to music as a single song can arguably be called a ballad. E.g. The Highway Man …
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    Any story set to music as a single song can arguably be called a ballad. E.g. The Highway Man by Alfred Noyes
    Sonnet
    ...
    or cdedce.
    The
    The Shakespearean (or
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    John Milton.
    The Shakespearean: Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
    Narrative
    ...
    An elegy is a lyric poem that praises a dead person or people. The subject may or may not be personally known to the poet.
    For example, Shelley's "Adonais" praises his friend Keats
    Visual/
    Concrete
    Concrete poetry
    This is poetry written in a shape resembling an object, which enriches its meaning.
    William Burford's poem "A Christmas Tree" is shaped in the form of a tree.
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    forgetting why,remember how
    Rhythm
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    of sound.
    The
    The regular reoccurrence
    Steady, irregular…
    Tempo
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    The regular rhythmic pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables.
    Foot
    ...
    different feet.
    Types
    Types of feet:
    Iambic Pentameter
    Consists of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable, repeated five times in a row.
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    Couplet
    A pair of rhyming verse lines, usually of the same length.
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    private place,
    But
    But none, I
    Caesura
    This is a pause in the rhythm.
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    sudden rush
    of
    of fortune. The
    Enjambment
    In poetry, when one line ends without a pause and continues into the next line for its meaning. This is also called a run-on line.
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    A rainbow in the sky:
    Imagery
    ...
    or states.
    Sensory
    Sensory imagery
    Visual
    # Visual imagery –
    Auditory imagery - sound
    Olfactory imagery - smell
    ...
    Kinaesthetic imagery – movement
    Emotive (natural) imagery - emotions
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    and low."
    2.
    2. "only the
    ...
    rapid rattle."
    3.
    3. Smell the
    ...
    that "reeks."
    4.
    4. "Come to
    ...
    night air!"
    5.
    5. "he holds
    ...
    skinny hand."
    6.
    6. "Of pebbles
    Simile
    A common figure of speech that makes an explicit comparison between two things by using words such as “like and as”
    ...
    Metaphor
    Compares two different things by speaking of one in terms of the other. Unlike a simile, metaphor asserts that one thing is another thing, not just that one is like another. Very frequently a metaphor is invoked by the to be verb
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    a pig”
    "he
    "he brayed his
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    to leave"
    “he
    “he was a
    Personification
    A form of metaphor in which human characteristics are attributed to nonhuman things.
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    Alliteration
    The repetition of identical sounds, most often the sounds at the beginning of words in close proximity. Alliteration is also a means of highlighting ideas through the repetition of similar sounds.
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    "luscious lemons."
    “Your
    “Your never-failing sword
    Consonance
    The repetition of a consonant sound. This repetition can occur at the beginning (initial consonance) or in the middle of words (internal consonance)
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    some butter
    2.
    2. Struts and
    Assonance
    The repetition of a vowel sound. As with consonance, the repetition can occur either initially or internally.
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    artful aid."
    2.
    2. "Her goodly
    Hyperbole
    Exaggeration for the sake of emphasis
    ...
    Paradox
    A statement or expression so self-contradictory as to provoke us into seeking another sense or context in which it would be true. Paradoxes are inherent in oxymoron and epigrams. Some paradoxes remain flatly self-contradictory.
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    of man’
    ‘Everything
    ‘Everything I say
    Oxymoron
    Oxymoron combines two usually contradictory terms.
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    Harshness of sound and/or rhythm, either inadvertent or deliberate.
    It denotes a lack of harmony between sounds rather than the harshness of a particular sound in isolation (cacophony).
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    the cats…
    Split
    Split open the
    ...
    salted sprats,”
    From
    From The Pied
    Euphony
    When the sound echoes the sense of the line, it contributes to the euphony, or pleasant sound, of poetry. Cacophony is the contrasting term.
    (view changes)
    3:32 am

Wednesday, May 9

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