ACT1.2 DETAILED ANALYSIS


POINT

EVIDENCE

TECHNIQUE

EXPLANATION

RESPONSE


Foreshadowing and irony


Brutus is wary of Cassius’s smooth manner of talking





Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus, and we petty men
Walk under his huge legs and peep about
To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Men at some time are masters of their fates:
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings. (Cassius, p.23)






















The audience learns that Caesar exerts his powers against those who disrespect him.





Caissus flatters Brutus and extols his worth





Well, Brutus, thou art noble; yet, I see,
Thy honourable mettle may be wrought
From that it is disposed




The contrast between Caesar’s public persona and his human flaws.